Wenke Lee

Wenke Lee, Ph.D., is co-director of the Institute for Information Security & Privacy (IISP) and responsible for continuing Georgia Tech's international leadership in cybersecurity research and education. Additionally, he is the John P. Imlay, Jr. Chair of Software and professor of computer science in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, where he has taught since 2001. Previously, he served as director of the IISP's predecessor -- the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) research lab -- from 2012 to 2015.

Lee is one of the most prolific and influential security researchers in the world. He has published several dozen, oft-cited research papers at top academic conferences, including the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security, USENIX Security, IEEE Security & Privacy ("Oakland"), and the Network & Distributed System Security (NDSS) Symposium.

His research expertise includes systems and network security, botnet detection and attribution, malware analysis, virtual machine monitoring, mobile systems security, and detection and mitigation of information manipulation on the Internet. Lee regularly leads large research projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, and private industry. Significant discoveries from his research group have been transferred to industry, and in 2006, doing so enabled Lee to co-found Damballa, Inc., which focused on detection and mitigation of advanced persistent threats.

Lee’s awards and honors include recognition as a 2017 ACM Fellow by the Association for Computer Machinery, the “Internet Defense Prize” awarded by Facebook and USENIX in 2015, an “Outstanding Community Service Award” from the IEEE Technical Committee on Security and Privacy in 2013, a Raytheon Faculty Fellowship in 2005, an NSF Career Award in 2002, as well as best paper awards in the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy and the ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining.

Passionate about quality education, Lee serves on the advisory boards of the Faculty of Engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the board of trustees at Pace Academy in Atlanta.

He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Columbia University in 1999.

 

Patents

 

  • Roberto Perdisci, Wenke Lee, and Gunter Ollmann. Method and system for network-based detecting of malware from behavioral clustering (U.S. Patent Number: 8,826,438, September 2014).
  • Manos Antonakakis, Roberto Perdisci, Wenke Lee, and Nikolaos Vasiloglou. Method and system for detecting malicious domain names at an upper DNS hierarchy (U.S. Patent Number: 8,631,489, January 2014).
  • Manos Antonakakis, Roberto Perdisci, Wenke Lee, and Gunter Ollmann. Method and System for Detecting Malware (U.S. Patent Number: 8,578,497, November 2013).
  • David Dagon, Nick Feamster, Wenke Lee, Robert Edmonds, Richard Lipton, and Anirudh Ramachandran. Method and System for Detecting and Responding to Attacking Networks (U.S. Patent Number: 8,566,928, October 2013).
  • Wei Fan, Wenke Lee, Matt, Miller, and Sal Stolfo. Methods for Cost-Sensitive Modeling for Intrusion Detection and Response (U.S. Patent Number: 7,818,797, October 2010).
  • Dan Schutzer, Will Foster, Huanrui Hu, Wenke Lee, Sal Stolfo, and Wei Fan. Method and System for Using Intelligent Agents for Financial Transactions, Services, Accounting, and Advice, (U.S. Patent Number: 5,920,848, July 1999).

 

Research Highlights

  1. Kangjie Lu, Chengyu Song, Taesoo Kim, and Wenke Lee. UniSan: Proactive Kernel Memory Initialization to Eliminate Data Leakages. In Proceedings of The 23rd ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), Vienna, Austria, October 2016.
  2. Chengyu Song, Hyungon Moon, Monjur Alam, Insu Yun, Byoungyoung Lee, Taesoo Kim, Wenke Lee, and Yunheung Paek. HDFI: Hardware-Assisted Data-flow Isolation. In Proceedings of The 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, San Jose, CA, May 2016.
  3. Wei Meng, Byoungyoung Lee, Xinyu Xing, and Wenke Lee. TrackMeOrNot: Enable Flexible Control on Web Tracking. In Proceedings of The 25th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW), Montreal, Canada, April 2016.
  4. Wei Meng, Ren Ding, Simon P. Chung, Steven Han, and Wenke Lee. The Price of Free: Privacy Leakage in Personalized Mobile In-Apps Ads. In Proceedings of The 2016 Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS), San Diego, CA, February, 2016.
  5. Kangjie Lu, Wenke Lee, Stefan Nurnberger, and Michael Backes. How to Make ASLR Win the Clone Wars: Runtime Re-Randomization. In Proceedings of The 2016 Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS), San Diego, CA, February, 2016.
  6. Chengyu Song, Byoungyoung Lee, Kangjie Lu, William Harris, Taesoo Kim and Wenke Lee. Enforcing Kernel Security Invariants with Data Flow Integrity. In Proceedings of The 2016 Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS), San Diego, CA, February, 2016.
  7. Meng Xu, Yeongjin Jang, Xinyu Xing, Taesoo Kim, and Wenke Lee. UCognito: Private Browsing without Tears. In Proceedings of The 22nd ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), Denver, CO, October 2015.
  8. Kangjie Lu, Chengyu Song, Byoungyoung Lee, Simon P. Chung, Taesoo Kim, and Wenke Lee. ASLR-Guard: Stopping Address Space Leakage for Code Reuse Attacks. In Proceedings of The 22nd ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), Denver, CO, October 2015.
  9. Byoungyoung Lee, Chengyu Song, Taesoo Kim, and Wenke Lee. Type Casting Verification: Stopping an Emerging Attack Vector. In Proceedings of The 24th USENIX Security Symposium, Washington, D.C., August 2015. (Awarded the Internet Defense Prize by Facebook and USENIX)
  10. Kangjie Lu, Zhichun Li, Vasileios P. Kemerlis, Zhenyu Wu, Long Lu, Cong Zheng, Zhiyun Qian, Wenke Lee, and Guofei Jiang. Checking More and Alerting Less:Detecting Privacy Leakages via Enhanced Data-flow Analysis and Peer Voting. In Proceedings of the 2015 Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS), Geneva, Switzerland, February 2015.
  11. Billy Lau, Pak Ho Chung, Chengyu Song, Yeongjin Jang, Wenke Lee, and Alexandra Boldyreva. Mimesis Aegis: A Mimicry Privacy Shield - A System's Approach to Data Privacy on Public Cloud. In Proceedings of The 23rd USENIX Security Symposium, San Diego, CA, August 2014.
  12. Byoungyoung Lee, Long Lu, Tielei Wang, Taesoo Kim, and Wenke Lee. From Zygote to Morula: Fortifying Weakened ASLR on Android. In Proceedings of The 2014 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, San Jose, CA, May 2014.
  13. Yeongjin Jang, Simon P. Chung, Bryan D. Payne, and Wenke Lee. Gyrus: A Framework for User-Intent Monitoring of Text-Based Networked Applications. In Proceedings of The 21st Annual Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS), San Diego, CA, February 2014.
  14. Yacin Nadji, Manos Antonakakis, Roberto Perdisci, and Wenke Lee. Beheading Hydras: Performing Effective Botnet Takedowns. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), Berlin, Germany, November 2013.
  15. Xinyu Xing, Wei Meng, Dan Doozan, Alex C. Snoeren, Nick Feamster, and Wenke Lee. Take this Personally: Pollution Attacks on Personalized Services. In Proceedings of the 22nd USENIX Security Symposium, Washington, D.C., August 2013.
  16. Tielei Wang, Kangjie Lu, Long Lu, Simon Chung, and Wenke Lee. Jekyll on iOS: When Benign Apps Become Evil. In Proceedings of the 22nd USENIX Security Symposium, Washington, D.C., August 2013.
  17. Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, Tim Leek, Michael Zhivich, Jonathon Giffin, and Wenke Lee. Virtuoso: Narrowing the Semantic Gap in Virtual Machine Introspection. In Proceedings of The 2011 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. Oakland, CA, May 2011.
  18. Manos Antonakakis, Roberto Perdisci, David Dagon, Wenke Lee, and Nick Feamster. Building a Dynamic Reputation System for DNS. In Proceedings of The 19th USENIX Security Symposium, Washington, DC, August 2010.
  19. Monirul Sharif, Andrea Lanzi, Jon Giffin, and Wenke Lee. Automatic Reverse Engineering of Malware Emulators. In Proceedings of The 2009 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, Oakland, CA, May 2009. (Best Student Paper Award)

For additional research, see Google Scholar